• pic
  • pic
  • pic
  • pic
  • pic
  • pic
  • pic
  • pic
  • pic
  • pic
  • pic

1 bowens weekly sermons button 1 twm daily news button 1 twm weekly guest sermons button

 

 

"The acceptance of the dogma of papal infallibility by Vatican 1 created, as already observed, a great gulf between Roman Catholicism and the rest of Christendom. In order to better understand the anti- Protestant feelings created during this council we may refer to one of its several dramatic scenes. In one of the council sessions the schema on modern nationalism was presented as one of the errors brought about by Protestantism. Joseph Georg Strossmayer, a former professor of Canon law and now Bishop, objected to this unjust charge. Referring to the schema under discussion he said, 'This judgment seems to me to be consistent neither with truth nor with charity. Bishop Strossmayer brought to the audience's attention that modern nationalism originated in France in direct opposition to the Christian faith, which Christians hold in common. The event is vividly portrayed in the following summary: 'The greatest storm broke out on March 22nd 1870 when Bishop Joseph Georg Strossmayer affirmed in the great hall of the Council that even among Protestants there were many individuals who loved Jesus. When he went on to dispute the feasibility of deciding dogmatic questions by majority rule, the majority shouted him down. Many cried out, ' Lucifer, Anathema, anathema!' Others screamed, 'A second Luther! Throw him out!' All the Infallibilists loudly demanded, 'Down with him, down with him!'" (V. Norskov Olsen, Papal Supremacy and American Democracy, p.94-95)

Who's Online

We have 184 guests and no members online