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“In the early chapters of 1 Chronicles a great deal of genealogical material is recorded. The purpose of these chapters is not merely to provide a family record for the descendants of Abraham, but to establish the flow of redemption in history from Adam through David, with a special emphasis upon the appointment of the sons of Aaron and the Levites to carry out the ministry of the Tabernacle. All was designed to point to Jesus Christ. As the Son of David He would be the Ruler of God's everlasting Kingdom. He would fulfill all that the ceremonies of Israel were designed to prefigure.

When the genealogy is complete, the inspired writer begins to recount Israel’s history with the defeat and death of Saul (chapter 10), noting particularly that the kingdom was taken away from Saul ‘because he did not keep the word of the Lord’ (verse 13). This is in reference to Saul’s presumption in offering burnt sacrifices contrary to God's command. Thus we are again reminded that God’s judgment -not man’s- is to direct the actions of His people, particularly with regard to matters of worship.

God is serious about the obedience of his people in their approach to him. (1 Chronicles 13)

After a brief summary of David's rise to power in Chapter 11 the author of Chronicles recounts the events surrounding the return of the ark of the covenant to Jerusalem. The botched first attempt to move the ark, culminating in the death of Uzzah, is recorded in chapter 13. The account is substantially the same as that found in 2 Samuel 6. Apparently, the holy Spirit considered this event worthy of repetition in
the sacred record, that we may learn how zealous God is for His people to approach Him with due regard to His appointed means.

Michael Bushnell notes, ‘no other example of Scripture shows more clearly the folly of ignoring God's own instructions as to how He is to be approached. Seen from a limited point of view Uzzah’s intentions were certainly ‘good’. But ‘will- worship,’ even when offered with the best of intentions, is still sacrilege. It is worth noting that the Philistines had not incurred such severe punishment for touching the ark. This shows that the Lord is especially zealous that His own people approach Him in a fitting manner. When the ark was later brought to Jerusalem, David was exceedingly careful to see that it was moved ‘as Moses had commanded according to the word of the Lord.’ (1 Chronicles 15:15). David's charge to the Levites on that occasion ought to be burned on the hearts of all who seek to worship the Lord in an acceptable and fitting manner: ‘Because you didn't carry it at first, the Lord made an outburst on us for we did not seek Him according to the ordinance.’ (1 Chronicles 15:13)” (Comin, 121-122)

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