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“Though sporadic reforms mark the latter history of Judah, the people continually reverted to their former sins, forsaking the commandments and worshipping after the desires of their own hearts. In the contrast, we are shown the nature of pure worship against the backdrop of its corruption.

Even the wisdom of Solomon cannot add to God’s ordinances (2 Chron. 7: 1-22)
“The record of 2 Chronicles takes up the history of God’s people with the reign of Solomon, the son of David. The first nine chapters of this book record the events of Solomon’s reign, with particular attention given to his construction and dedication of the Temple of the Lord in Jerusalem. Through David and Solomon, God revealed the particular details of His worship which would remain in place for the remainder of Israel’s history.

We have already noted that every detail of the worship of Israel was made known by direct revelation from God, and His Word was to be carefully followed. No place was given to human creativity in determining when, where, or how God was to approached by His people.

This is an important fact to be noted, since some insist that while the strict regulation of Old Testament temple worship was necessary because of the particular typological significance of the service, the New Testament church is no longer bound by such peculiarity and is therefore free to express creativity and innovation in the worship of God. The simple fact of the matter is that not a single example of such
alleged creativity in the elements of worship can be found in the New Testament Scriptures.

Where is all of the outworking of creativity produced by this greater enlightenment? Where are the choruses and the orchestras? Where are the dramatic presentations and performances of ‘special music’? Should we not expect, if the advocates of this greater license in the elements of worship are correct, to find the apostles even leading the way in the implementation of appropriate additions to the service of worship among the churches they founded? Yet we find not one example of such things. What is found, instead, is a simple spiritual worship, stripped of all of the outward and typological elements of the Old Testament ceremonies, yet still perfectly regulated by the revealed will of God with no allowance for human innovation which the apostles condemned as ‘will- worship.’

It is often implied in the arguments of those who advocate creativity in worship that believers under the New Covenant possess a superior wisdom and spirituality to that of their Old Testament counterparts, and are therefore equipped to determine what innovations are appropriate and what are not. Yet we may be sure that there is not a representative in all of the Church who rivals Solomon for wisdom.

Early in 2 Chronicles we are told how it was that Solomon came to possess wisdom and judgment that far exceeded any other man, and would be excelled only by Christ Himself. Solomon’s wisdom was a gift from God, bestowed upon him by divine grace. When God offered to grant him anything he desired, Solomon asked not for fame or wealth, but for wisdom in order to govern God people well. This was a humble request, and in response God gave him what he asked for, as well as what he didn't seek. Solomon thus learned the relationship between humility and wisdom: ‘The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.’

The application of this lesson to worship is seen in the fact that Solomon, for all of his wisdom, did not presume to add anything to the worship of God that he had not received from his father David, and thus by divine inspiration. He did not presume, as many do today, that he was wise enough to determine how God should be approached. He knew that the first act of wisdom was to acknowledge his own ignorance of spiritual truth, and submit his heart to pursue obedience to God's Word. This is a lesson that needs to be understood today by those who presume that they are wise enough to determine for themselves what is or is not pleasing to God in His worship. Fear the Lord and do according to all that He has commanded for this is your wisdom.” (Comin, 135-137)

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