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“The book of job is largely made-up of the discourses that pass between this suffering saint and three so-called friends who visit him in his affliction and seek to demonstrate that Job must be guilty of some great sin for which he is being punished. Job’s answers to his accusers are interspersed between their speeches. Following a lengthy monologue by Job, a young man named Elihu addresses the group and delivers a series of speeches on the power and justice of God, but his words were cut off by the Lord Himself, who answers Job and humbles him. The book ends with Job’s repentance, a rebuke from God to his foolish counselors, the intercession of Job on behalf of his friends, and an account of the restoration of the sufferer’s prosperity.

While the words that pass between Job and his friends missed the mark with regard to the cause of suffering in the world, there is much truth in their observations of the nature and effects of righteousness and wickedness in general. Job’s reply to Zophar recorded in chapter 21 is a case in point.

His purpose is to prove that it is often the case in this life that the wicked prosper while the godly suffer affliction. In making his argument, Job shines a light upon the inclination of the wicked to seek their own fulfillment above obedience to God. He portrays the wicked and their children rejoicing in their prosperity with dancing and joyful music. They are hedonistic to the core, intent upon nothing but the enjoyment of this world's passing pleasures. Conformity to God's commands only stands in the way of their self- seeking desires. They dismiss God, saying. ‘We do not desire the knowledge of Your ways.’ Literally, the phrase is: ‘We find no pleasure in the understanding of your path.’ God's commands are no part of their thought. They see no benefit to the duties of prayer and piety.

The attitude of the wicked describes so eloquently by Job continues from age to age. There are many today, even in the Church, who find the pursuit of the knowledge of God's ways a burdensome obstacle to their personal fulfillment. They see God's commands as a burdensome service, and come to His house asking, ‘What's in it for me?’ The answer of Job to such self -seeking men stands fast: ‘Behold, their good is not in their hand!’ In other words, they do not know what is best for them, nor will they find true blessing by rejecting God's
ordinances in favor of their self-serving activities. The real blessing of worship is found by those who lay aside their obsession with personal fulfillment, and seek Him according to His revealed will.” (Comin, 179-180)

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